Style Approach Notes

  • Style Approach: Tasks vs. Relationships There are two important behaviors related to leadership style: task and relationship.

    Tasks vs. Relationships There are two important behaviors related to leadership style: task and relationship.\n\n ","right":"http://student.land/style-approach-tasks-vs-relationships-there-are-two-important-behaviors-related-to-leadership-style-task-and-relationship/\n\nStyle Approach: Tasks vs. Relationships\n\nThere are two important behaviors related to leadership style: task and relationship. Task behaviorsfacilitate goal accomplishment by helping group members achieve their objectives (Northouse, 2004, p. 65). Relationship behaviors help “subordinates feel comfortable with themselves, with each other, and with the situation in which they find themselves” (Northouse, 2004, p. 65). Finding the optimum way to lead has been the optimum goal of many researchers at several universities. \n\nThe Ohio State University Studies\n\nIn the late 1940s, the leadership research program at “Ohio State” measured specific leadership behaviors. The researchers had subordinates complete questionnaires about their leaders by using the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ). Researchers found that subordinates’ responses on the questionnaire clustered around two underlying dimensions of leader behaviors:initiating structure and consideration. Initiating structure behaviors were essentially “task” behaviors focused on getting work completed as efficiently as possible. On the other hand, consideration behaviors were essentially “relationship” behaviors focused on building friendships. Around the same time, researchers at the University of Michigan were also investigating leadership behavior.\n\nUniversity of Michigan Studies\n\nThe “Michigan studies” revealed two types of leadership behaviors: employee orientation andproduction orientation. Surprisingly, those studies revealed similar concepts to initiating structure and consideration. Employee orientation describes the behaviors of leaders who approach followers or subordinates with a humanistic perspective or “relationship” orientation. On the other hand, production orientation describes the behaviors of leaders who focus on productivity and efficiency or “task” orientation. Northouse (2004) explains, “Unlike the Ohio State researchers, the Michigan researchers, in their initial studies, conceptualized employee and production orientations as opposite ends of a single continuum” and further explains, “that leaders who were oriented toward production were less oriented to employees, and those who were employee oriented were less production oriented” (p. 68). Since then, researchers have used this framework to better understand the behaviors of leaders from different cultures. There are several key traits that contribute to a leader’s success.\n\nFor this SLP, you will complete a short survey and then will analyze your results.\n\nSurvey instructions: Take the following task vs. relationship leadership survey. After you have completed the survey, add up your scores for tables 1 and table 2 to determine your dominant leadership style. To determine your dominant personal leadership style, circle one of the following options that best describe how you see yourself (or the person that is being evaluated) regarding each statement. For each statement, you can indicate the degree to which you (or the person being evaluated) engage (s) in the stated behavior. A rating of 1 means Never and a rating of 5 means Always with the person demonstrating the specific behavior.\n\nTable 1 – “A” Style and Orientation"},{"left":"","


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